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All Things in Context: A Definitive Defense of Scott Summers

An Editorial From Christopher Franey & Rafael Encinas

      With the resurrection of Scott Summers in Extermination and Uncanny X-men Annual #1 (2019) there has been major buzz surrounding this iconic character. Specifically, many are buzzing about the old age question:  Was Cyclops Right?  According to Renaldo Matadeen in CBR.com’s article “Cyclops Finally Settles Marvel’s Most Popular X-men Argument,” the author goes straight to the end result of Cyclops, himself, saying he was wrong. Although Matadeen makes some good points about the decision, we argue that in the context of Scott’s full story not only was Cyclops right in his actions, but these decisions were paramount to the survival of the mutant species.  It is easy to criticize Scott out of context and as a hero, but Scott is more than that. He is ultimately responsible for the mutant population’s survival during their most perilous time. 

Why Cyclops Was Right

     If you go back and look at the crossover event, House of M (2005), with the New Avengers and the Astonishing X-men, we can see that both teams faced hardships and essentially had to fight for their existence. However, once reality gets restored to normal, the Mutants have to deal with Scarlet Witch’s curse of ‘No More Mutants.’ So, did reality really go back to normal for the X-men?   This was a turning point into the way Scott Summers saw himself; basically, Cyclops the hero was traded in for Cyclops the War Time General; Scott was the man who inherited the crisis after M-Day.  In a time where fellow Mutants he counted on were gone, missing, or depowered, a time when powerful enemies were empowered to wipe them out, and a situation where fellow heroes like the Avengers and S.H.I.E.L.D. were not as sympathetic as they could have been, Scott and the Mutants had their backs to the wall.  During this time, the Avengers were getting ready for their split with the upcoming Civil War event, which did spill into the lives of the remaining Mutants; and S.H.I.E.L.D. was just suffering losing Nick Fury from his actions during the Secret War and were now adapting to new leadership under Maria Hill. 

     Scott wakes up to a “Days of Future Past” scenario played out on his front yard with the O.N.E. (Office of National Emergency) Sentinels assigned to protect the remaining Mutant population; an action, by the way, that the X-men were not asked about beforehand. The sentinels after all were monstrous reminders of genocide to the mutant population, so this action was not okay on both a psychological and cultural level.  Though O.N.E. was created due to the sudden drop in population of the Mutants, the safe haven of Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters now resembled a reservation camp with death machines as guards. One could argue that this was done in the best interest for the Mutants, especially considering that this time, the sentinels would be manned and controlled by humans. However, the Sentinel program doesn’t have a good track record with anyone, and ultimately, the O.N.E Sentinels did lead to the destruction of the Xavier mansion during Messiah Complex when Bishop comprised them.  With the X-men and the rest of the remaining 198 Mutants on Earth being guarded, this raised tensions and did cause the 198 Riot. Needless to say, the little help that was offered was poor, and the Mutants didn’t feel safe amongst themselves.  

     Then the Superhero Civil War happened. After this debacle, Steve Rogers was an enemy of the state and then presumed dead before he could make it to the courthouse for his trial.  Tony Stark had become the Top Cop and in charge of S.H.I.E.L.D. and finally goes to the Mutants, a.k.a. Scott, and instead of offering aid or protection, he wants the Mutants to register.  Scott tells Tony, “Being a Mutant isn’t what we do Tony- It’s not a choice.  So, do you want us to register for being born?  Is that really who you are now?” (Uncanny X-Men #495, 2008)

    All these hardships were further complicated by Scott’s lack of support, specifically from his mentor, Charles Xavier. Charles was not in good graces with Scott and the X-men since he lied about Danger, an A.I., being sentient and then imprisoning her. He also erased the existence of Gabriel Summers and the X-men team before the All New All Different team. And more evidence was discovered by Scott and Emma that showed Xavier was manipulating people for the greater good, as he would call it, and also manipulating memories.  Therefore, Scott’s surrogate father and longtime ally was both absent and at odds with the X-Men at the moment when Mutants were most vulnerable and in most need. 

     Not only that, but this was a time of a more aggressive campaign to exterminate the Mutant population. For example:

  • The Purifiers killing Xavier students on school grounds, including the explosion of a school bus filled with depowered mutants.
  • The return of powerful enemies, Apocalypse and Belasco.
  • Nimrod’s attack on the younger New X-men team.
  • The return of an angry Hulk looking for the head of Professor Xavier for his role in The Illuminati; a scenario where Scott did still stand in defense for Xavier.
  • Violent campaigns of Mister Sinister’s Marauders and Exodus’ Acolytes.
  • The extermination of the Grey Family line by the Shiar Empire.

     In this context, one can see that Scott was on the defense of a never ending onslaught of extermination events.  Therefore he had to change tactics, Cyclops the Hero would now have to become a Compromising Commander. The days of coming in and saving the day, astonishing the public, and fighting for Pro Human Mutant relations had to take a back seat to survival. No one could do that, except Scott; the Hero the Mutants needed, but not the Hero Scott had ever been before.  It is during this time in comics from Messiah Complex, to the diaspora to San Francisco, to the founding of Utopia, and to the development of Scott’s Extinction team, that we see a more proactive and militant Cyclops. 

     After the Cooperstown tragedy, Scott went from the defensive to a full on offense to protect the preservation of the Mutant population and the newly born Mutant since M-Day.  This lead to Cyclops to reform X-Force and have them recover the new baby from whoever had it. The twist is that Cable was the one to save the baby from Marauders, Purifiers, Acolytes, and Bishop so this would come to an apex when the X-men finally caught up to Cable.  When Cyclops is confronted with all of this and hears Cable’s plea to go to the future with the new baby, Scott does something different, instead of playing it safe and demanding the baby stay in current times, he decides to trust Cable to protect the baby in the future. 

     This is a big moment for Scott because he understands the dangers Mutants are facing in the current timeline, and this new baby represents Hope for rebirth. Instead of striving for absolute control by keeping her, he takes a leap of faith and trusts his son even when his trust in others is shattered by Bishop’s defect.  It says something to the perilous times Cyclops was in that he would let his last hope for Mutant survival be risked away into the future where Scott had no say; remember Cyclops is a man of total control. 

     This is important because now whereas Cyclops was originally trying to keep his people alive, he now has the goal of doing the same thing but with the added hope of bringing the Mutants back to safer numbers and reviving the species.  Cyclops disbands the X-men after Messiah Complex in hopes that they will now find a new safe haven since the mansion was destroyed and Xavier was killed.  We believe that Cyclops has three main objectives at this point:

  1. Migrate the Mutant population to a more accepting community to live and thrive.
  2. Build up a PR department that will humanize the Mutant struggle.
  3. Actively neutralize Mutant threats through the X-Force team. 

Scott gets focus and clarity of vision in creating a better world for mutants, especially for when Hope, the mutant baby, eventually returns. These goals are met when Scott has the mutants migrate to the tolerant San Francisco area, when he joins forces with Katie Kildare in creating a positive PR department making the Mutant menace image go away, and by having X-Force eliminate Apocalypse on their first mission.  Scott leads his people into a new age of hope and prosperity, but like all X-Men stories, the good times do not last long, especially when a threat from Outer Space comes along, the Skrulls. 

The Secret Invasion event occurs, and the heroes have an identity crisis. But not the X-Men. In a world where no one knows who to trust because they may be a Skrull in hiding, the X-Men get ready to defend all the people of San Francisco, not just the mutant population.  Cyclops knew that the X-men wouldn’t have to worry about a Skrull in hiding since he knew the X-men are more than a team. If a sleeper Skrull was in the X-Men ranks, they would have approached San Francisco differently.  Here one can see the Skrulls miscalculated Scott Summers, and that was costly as this was the battlefront where they lost ground and troops.

Interestingly, this is one of the moments in where fans feel uneasy about Cyclops since he does threaten Skrull genocide by weaponizing the Legacy Virus. That is understandable, but let us not forget that the Skrulls are a highly aggressive alien invading force with a track record of absolute savagery. The stakes were also at an all-time high because the Skrulls almost successfully conquered the Earth since the Avengers were uneasy trusting themselves after the Civil War. And lastly, instead of choosing to purge themselves, the Skrulls could have surrendered and left earth because Scott did offer them a cure for the virus, which technically, was a bluff since it wasn’t created…yet. 

     We want to note that in the context of keeping his people alive, Cyclops did do and sanction un-heroic acts in the name of Mutant preservation.  With the classic heroic Cyclops and the X-men, we would have seen them fight the Skrulls in a typical comic book fashion that would’ve been more ethical and close to the wire as the Skulls would have had a sleeper.  However, we are watching Cyclops transcend from heroic leader of the X-men to face of the Mutant nation; just like Black Panther to the Wakandians, Black Bolt to the Inhumans, Namor to the Atlantis People, and Odin to the Asgardians.  So holding Cyclops’ actions as despicable and vile hold no weight when he does these things for his peoples’ survival. After all, what is the age old rule?  If it is in self-defense, you have the right to defend yourself.  So, why does he get painted as Marvel’s Mutant menace?  He starts to be seen as a menace because of rising tensions and crime in Human/Mutant relations in the San Francisco area. This means that the new Top Cop has to come in and fix these issues, so Norman Osborn comes to town.

     Now, we as fans know that Norman Osborn is a bastard, killer of Gwen Stacy and many, many other horrendous acts.  The super human community knows this as well, but can’t do anything since Norman becomes the Government after the events of Secret Invasion.  So when Scott and Norman come to blows in public, Scott’s already controversial image is now amplified and public fear rises when Scott successfully secedes from the United States and creates his own Mutant nation of Utopia.  This is important to his public image because Cyclops has now beaten Norman, aka the Government, and surrounds himself with other controversial figures such as Magneto, Namor, and Emma Frost (fellow Mutants and X-men) on the island of Utopia which was once Asteroid M.  In context, the reader who has perspective into Cyclops’ actions sees what Scott is doing. He is furthering the cause by showing strength, by raising Mutant defensives in a hostile world. However, to the general public in the Marvel universe, they see Cyclops becoming aggressively militant with a group of powerful mutants, and they are right next door. Both characterizations of Cyclops’ actions have truth to them, but the image is a necessity in Cyclops’ actions for the Mutants in their survival. 

     Just to keep a track on the other major players in the Marvel universe, we see that Steve Rogers is about to return from his “death” and will become Captain America again to help stop Norman’s Dark Reign; after that Steve gets to be the Top Cop in the MU.  Tony Stark had to go into running since he knew all the heroes’ information about their secret lives which led to him being reset in terms of his memory.  Xavier had to rebuild himself after being “killed” by Bishop, which led to him rediscovering his memoires and now just being another Mutant on Utopia. 

     Things look pretty good right?  Cyclops has effectively united the mutants and created a fortified safe haven to protect his people. Well, things go from zero to one hundred real quick with the events of Second Coming. Cable returns to the current timeline from the future with an older Hope. However, they are not welcomed by the X-Men, but instead an onslaught of militarized mutant hate groups, specifically the devilish Stryker and his Purifiers. So, in this event, Cyclops pulls out all the guns in order to extract Hope and Cable from hostile territory. Many casualties amount, including the notable deaths of Nightcrawler and Cable, and then there is an epic showdown on the Golden Gate Bridge with a horde of Nimrod Sentinels led by the relentless Bastion.  To put it simply, Second Coming is a very serious and important moment for the mutant population. It showcases that Cyclop’s faith in a mutant renaissance was not in vain. This proved to be Cyclops’ most important gamble and battle for the survival of the Mutant species, which paid off in the form of the Five Lights.  To give credit, the Fantastic Four and Avengers did try to assist but were blocked from the battle by a force field, and after the battle, Steve Rogers wanted to give a good public image to the Mutants by giving Scott the Presidential Medal of Freedom award.  Ultimately, Cyclops’ faith paid out and the Mutants have a fighting chance. 

So, where do we hear the voices that claim Cyclops was wrong?  First, they begin in the actual Marvel Universe. Up until this point, Cyclops has been gradually painted in a negative light by the press, especially considering the world’s intolerance of mutants.  So that means that the press has deemed Cyclops the villain, especially after the psychic attack of Quentin Quire at the U.N., where Cyclops was asking the rest of the world to suspend their production of Mutant killing sentinels.  Quentin’s outcry for attention negatively puts the Mutants back to the wall once again; leading to world leaders recommissioning sentinels in lieu of this childish outburst.  Now the face of the Mutant menace has returned, undoing the good PR by Katie Kildare. 

     Mutants are once again attacked in the streets and even at public events, which we saw with the new child led Hellfire Club as they put Idie in a situation where she might have to kill in order to survive.  Cyclops understood this and wanted her to do what she deemed best, while Wolverine wanted her to do nothing at all and figured he would make it in time to save her.  Ultimately Idie did kill the Hellfire Soldier in self-defense, which would be the schism between Scott and Logan’s ideology.  It is important to note that many claim Scott’s use of child soldiers as an unheroic act, even villainous act; however once again in the context of his situation, he always gave his students a choice and one could argue that the X-men were always founded as child soldiers.  So, at best Cyclops used children in worst-case scenarios as a last means of defense; at worst, Cyclops was only doing what Xavier taught him to do, what he himself was raised to do. Let us not forget that Cyclops himself was a child soldier who has fought for his life and the lives of others for a very long time.  Whether this is ethically correct is mute. Scott acts for the preservation of his species which is put above all else.

     The Schism event weakened the Mutant population by having half of the residents relocate back to New York in the newly founded Jean Grey School for Higher Learning; which Wolverine used Jean’s name as a dagger against Cyclops.  This would further make things difficult for Scott because he was now facing a war on two fronts; so he created the Extinction team as a nuclear deterrent to keep the students at Wolverine’s school safe.  Cyclops was once again thinking of Mutant Human relations only this time, if humans weren’t going to respect Mutants out of equality, they would respect out of fear. Basically, the X-Men would become so essential to the earth’s survival, that the world wouldn’t want them dead; they would need them. Was this the best move for Cyclops?  The real question was, “What was Cyclops’ alternative?”

     Another talking point of Cyclops’ decent into full villainy is in his villainous role in Avengers Vs. X-Men.  Does Cyclops kill Professor X?  Yes.  Does Cyclops go full Dark Phoenix?  Yes.  Does Cyclops distrust and refuse help from the Avengers?  Yes.  In this frame, one can say that Scott could have better choices about his actions.  Especially in letting his fellow heroes help him combat the most destructive force the X-men have ever seen, the Phoenix.  But why should Cyclops do this?  Especially with the track record the Avengers have had in helping with Mutant catastrophe.  What many people fail to realize is that Scott’s hostility toward Captain America isn’t just because he believes Steve is trying to take control of a situation he doesn’t understand or have experience with, but Cyclops is warned of the upcoming conflict between the Avengers and X-Men from his son Cable in the X-Sanction event. 

     At the start of this event, we see a newly returned from the dead Cable who goes on the hunt for Avengers.  After successfully capturing Captain America, Iron-man, Falcon, and Red Hulk, Cable then sets a bomb to go off thus eliminating the AVX event.  Spider-man, Wolverine, Cyclops, and Hope all arrive to stop Cable and save the Avengers. In the conflict, we see Cable be fully taken over by the T.O. virus and lose.  Cyclops asks to take care of his son back at Utopia, and when they get him there, Scott witnesses Hope absorb the T.O. virus from Cable and burn it out like a Phoenix would.  Cable and Cyclops then have a telepathic conversation in which Cable points this out to Scott and tells him that the Avengers cannot win this or the future is doomed for everyone. 

     This is interesting because many who blame Scott pinpoint his isolationist approach at combating the Phoenix to be his most arrogant, thinking he is the only one who can handle the Phoenix threat.  For being such a great tactician, how can he possibly have faith that Hope Summers could contain this fire bird?  However, he doesn’t blindly believe. He has seen the positive regenerative aspects of the Phoenix firsthand when Hope heals Cable, and also, he has no reason to distrust his son, a successful time traveler who hasn’t be wrong before and who has never betrayed Scott.  So, Cyclops sets in motion events that will finally bring back the Mutant population. As he says the Phoenix is coming back to rebirth the Mutant population, and so he gets Hope ready.  Everything he has done for the mutant species has led to this moment. 

     But things don’t go as planned. Because of interference from the Avengers, the Phoenix Force is split into five pieces and is thrust upon Cyclops, Emma Frost, Namor, Illyana, and Colossus creating the Phoenix Five; a super group of mutants with the power of the Phoenix! Oh no, one would expect these individuals to run wild and destroy everything, considering that the Phoenix Force has a very bad track record.

    But even with the destructive force of the Phoenix, does Scott lose control?  No.

    He leads the Phoenix Five into creating Pax Utopia, a world with sustainable energy and plentiful crops for everyone. They start working at making the world a better place for humans and mutants alike. They stop all conflicts and become the world’s nuclear deterrent.  In this world of his, we see Xavier and Magneto meet with no hostilities and no reason to fight.  Cyclops, who at this point is painted as a Mutant Supremacist, could have easily created his own version of House of M, thus making Mutants superior and Humans lesser. But, he does not do this.  Under his leadership the Phoenix Five make a better world.  However, Steve Rogers and Tony Stark do not like this, as the age old adage goes:  Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely.  Therefore, they assemble the Avengers and join with Xavier to provoke and challenge the Phoenix Five.  One by one, Namor, Illyana, Colossus, and Emma fall apart and give into the fiery passion of the Phoenix, leaving Scott as the only one left in possession of the cosmic bird’s power.       

     At this point, it can be argued that Cyclops would have eventually lost control and could have gone full Superman from Injustice by initiating absolute and total control and fascist rule, even without the interference from the Avengers. However, from the evidence we have and the actions taken, Scott doesn’t lose control and legitimately tries to bring Xavier’s dream to fruition; even when his other compatriots with the Phoenix power give in.  Only when the Avengers Vs. X-Men event succumbs to Everyone versus Scott Summers, do we see Scott pushed over the edge.  We see him succumb to the influence of the Dark Phoenix, and he murders his mentor, Charles Xavier, in cold blood. But why does this happen? What evil had Scott actually done up until this point? He worked so hard for so long to help his people, to be a hero to all the world, and he accomplishes his goal by making a better world, by harnessing a destructive force for good, even with the fear and knowledge of what that power did to the first one he loved.  He sacrificed so much and lost so many to get to this point. And what did he get in return?  He gets hate, fear, and rejection from the people who are supposed to be his friends, allies, and family. He gets rejected by the very world that he was trying to save; Scott can’t win. 

     Needless to say, the Avengers are the favorites in the Marvel Universe, and they ultimately lay the smackdown on Cyclops. Broken and dejected, imprisoned and slandered, he is given no trial and becomes enemy number one.  He becomes a war criminal in the aftermath of losing complete control of the Phoenix Force, but Scott is much more than himself and realizes Mutants still need him; especially with the new Mutants that will need him after their rebirth from the Phoenix.  Cyclops was right. He was right about the Phoenix being a tool of rebirth for the mutant species, but there was a price and he had no time to wallow because he now took his character assassinated image to start the Mutant Revolution. 

     Again in this context, Cyclops can be seen once again as pushing the tensions between Mutant and Human relations.  He was branded a war criminal by the Avengers and the world, escaped prison, and was threatening police and the world in general in favor of Mutant equality.  Though he speaks of Mutant Revolution, which is a powerful word, and can understandably make people uncomfortable, Cyclops never advocated for Mutant Supremacy.  His back was to the wall once again and these circumstances led him to be more revolutionary as the media turned him into a monster.  So he played the part; but what did he really ever do?  During Bendis’ Uncanny X-men run, with the help of Emma, Illyana, and Magneto, Scott liberated Mutants from government containment and homicide.  At this point there was nothing Cyclops could do to better his image, so again he went on the offensive to proactively train and protect new Mutants, all while having a mental breakdown for killing his surrogate father (who, arguably, was acting like a bastard). 

     In the end, he still did right for his people even though a great majority of them now hated him for the execution of Xavier.  He would go onto doing his best until finally succumbing to character assassination at the hands of the Inhuman Royal family’s retelling of the Terrigen Mist Cloud crisis. 

     So this leads us to Uncanny X-men Annual #1 (2019) which gives Scott a new chance for redemption.  Does he need it?  Yes, because, in universe, Marvel has painted him out to be a Mutant Hitler, which can be understandable due to the events as they are interpreted from the media and from a population that already discredits, fears, and hates Mutants. 

    Does Scott deserve redemption?  The simple answer is no. 

    Yes, Scott does terrible things, it’s hard to rationalize some of his decisions, but in context everything he does, he does with his back to the wall.  He uses strategy and tactics to keep his people alive; in times of war, which arguably, the Mutants were constantly in. Scott could not be the hero, and he understood that. 

     We are a bit upset with the Annual for Scott stating that he was wrong.  In what context is he saying these words?  We like to think that he believes he was right in what he did, but honestly what else could he have done when the deck was so stacked against him?  He might be wrong in the fact that he ultimately lost sight of the future of Human and Mutant relations, especially considering that his heavy handedness could be problematic, but we are hopeful.  This annual gives Scott the chance to change his public image.  The world may no longer need Militant Cyclops, leader of the Mutants.  Instead this is a chance for Scott Summers, the Astonishing Hero, to return and set it right. 

Comic Culture With Rafa: #004

Welcome To The End Of The World: The Magnificence of The Walking Dead Vol. 1
A Review From Rafael Encinas

There’s a reason that AMC’s The Walking Dead is such a cultural phenomena; that it is able to entertain such a wide variety of people. I know that my parents love watching the “Zombies” as they call it, and can really get into all the intense drama and zombie bashing galore that the show is known for. This is major because they don’t typically like anything that my sisters and I enjoy. So, seeing them eagerly await Sundays to watch this show as some new, weird family bonding ritual is pretty interesting and pretty breathtaking. This shows me that The Walking Dead has become a big part of culture; that it transcends just entertainment.

Regardless, it can be argued that the reason it has become such a cultural phenomena is because it explores a key concept that all humans struggle with:

How does the world continue when society collapses?

How do you go on when all hope is lost?

When threats are all around you, you are only left to ponder on the nostalgia of yesterday’s world, on the triviality of everyday. In a world where the dead try to eat you, it makes you miss the good ol’ days of school and taxes. That’s some pretty heavy shit.

Well, if you love The Walking Dead or are turned off to it because of the heavy excess of zombie pop culture today, do not let it deter you from the smart, keen, and beautifully illustrated The Walking Dead comic series where the show came from. Robert Kirkman’s and Tony Moore’s first volume of The Walking Dead: Days Gone Bye (2004) is not only arguably the most important zombie comic ever conceived, but it is just masterful storytelling that you become invested in. Seeing Rick’s venture into a dead world is captivating. Robert Kirkman is able to tell a story with a lot of movement and still shots that can both shock and awe. Tony Moore’s illustrations (my favorite of The Walking Dead series) use a lot of detail that really add a depth to the storytelling which is only further enhanced by its black and white hues. It is almost as if it is a nightmare that you want to wake up from; a world devoid of color and life.

The story does have zombies, but the story isn’t really about zombies.  There is real human drama in the narrative that makes it so iconic. It is the characters in this series, specifically in this volume that keep the reader’s interested. You grow to care for the survivors all the way to the bitter end. And if The Walking Dead had ended with just this first volume, it would still be pretty impactful with the final thematic scene. It’s like poetry in comic form. Read it. It’s good.

On The John: Dark Horses’ Stranger Things

A Review From John Camarena

As many of you may know, I’m quite a fan of Stranger Things. This show resonates with my 80’s nostalgia. It’s a fantastic blend of pop culture icons; everything from Stephen King to Stephen Spielberg, sci-fi and fantasy. The very first episode got me hooked, from that synthesizer theme song to the sprinkles of Dungeons and Dragons, Knight Rider, E.T., and so on. And the story is great too boot! Unlike the kitchen sink approach that Ready Player One threw at us, this show has an interesting mystery, likable characters, and well-paced action beats. It genuinely captures what it felt like to be a nerdy child with an overactive imagination. And now, while we wait for Season 3’s trailer to drop (any freakin’ day now please!) the supplemental materials are now making their way to tide us over: The Official Stranger Things Companion book, the Dr. Brenner-centric novel Suspicious Minds, and a whole slew of unofficial books are now available, with many more to come. As someone who loves consuming this stuff, I had to dive in and chose the 4-part comic book series just as the 4th issue released, because at the end of the day, Stranger Things is meant to be binged. Does the comic book meet the same level of awesome that the show does? Almost.

Massive spoilers ahead if you haven’t watched seasons 1 and 2, by the way, so here goes. The comic book 4-parter was written by Jody Houser, with art by Stefano Martino. Who are these people? I don’t really know, as I’ve not kept up with comic books for a very long time, but between the two of them, they seem to have done good work in the past. The comic takes place simultaneously with the events of the first season, beginning when Will Buyers realizes there’s something strange and dangerous in his home and runs to hide in the shed out back. Something not shown in the show is how exactly Will ends up in the Upsidedown, and this comic basically shows him teleporting there. Unlike other characters and sometimes the Demogorgon who are shown having to walk or crawl through a gross-looking portal that resembles an open wound in the fabric of reality, Will just kind of blinks and is suddenly in the Silent Hill version of Hawkins that we come to refer as the Upsidedown. Here he has his first encounter with the creature, and Will shoots it right in the toothy petal-head then it disappears. From here, the narrative jumps around with flashbacks to events leading up to the present, such as some more interactions between Will and his friends, Dungeons & Dragons campaigners Mike, Dustin and Lucas. We see a little more of their previous adventure and learn that Dustin and Lucas are apprehensive about Will’s choice to be a Mage, and questions his usefulness to the quest. This is put in contrast with the real danger he is in the present. While being shown as indecisive and defensive in the real world, Will takes action and fights back against the Demogorgon and goes out exploring the Upsidedown, trying to make sense of his situation. It’s here that I really appreciated the comic due to Will processing things as if it was a D&D campaign. Will finds strength by relating to his Mage character, imagining he is on some sort of quest he must endure after being separated from his party. These sections are short, and they depict them both with fantasy-style art and with versions that looked like they were drawn by Will himself, a reference to the character art shown in the series. I actually would have really liked if the whole series was done in this style, as that seems to tie in better without having to reveal too much or make up things that may be out of place or not fit in to the continuity.

Now, the majority of the story is set during the 7 days that Will was missing in the real world, and we do see how some of the time unfolds from Will’s point of view. It is shown that Will can sometimes hear the people calling out to him, and that although the Upsidedown appears to be devoid of life or light, there is still a connection to the powergrid of the real world that he has an indirect effect on. For instance, the Christmas light Ouija board that his mom, Joyce Buyers makeshifts on the living room wall works by having Will touch the corresponding letters on his side, and we are to infer that his proximity to the light is what causes it to react. It’s never spelled out and it is not consistent either; for instance, the first time Joyce hears Will faintly on the telephone, Will was trying to use the walkie talkie. It’s not clear if anyone in the Upsidedown would be able to do this or if there is something special about Will. After some time passes, Will decides to leave the house and explore around the town, and it is during this excursion that he sees Eleven for the first time. She appears almost as a vision, because she does not seem to be entirely corporeal, but she does seem to also see Will, which explains how she knew about him when she sees a picture of him at Mike’s house. The exploration portions turned out to be my least favorite part of this series, however.

Now after Will goes exploring, he essentially visits all the same other parts of the Upsidedown that other characters come into contact with. Will hears Barb scream for help and he follows her voice, but by the time he arrives to the pool outside of Steve Harrington’s house, all that’s left are Barb’s glasses. Will returns home and sees that a portal stared forming in the living room wall and makes brief contact with his mom, but has to run away when again the Demogorgon attacks. While Will is out in the woods, he almost runs into Nancy Wheeler, Mike’s older sister, and Johnathan, his older brother. According to the comic, he was within stone-throwing distance of meeting up with them in the Upsidedown, but just missed them. He also runs into a wounded victim of the Demogorgon that dies before his eyes, and eventually makes his way to Castle Buyers, a wooden fort in the woods of Hawkins, where Eleven makes contact with him letting him know that they haven’t given up hope and are still looking for him, even after a fake body was planted in the quarry by Hawkins Lab and presumed to be him. Finally, after days without food or water and cold due to the lifeless nature of the environment, Will is found by the Demogorgon. Will wakes up in the public library, which is now a nest of sorts and there are other bodies strewn about. While the other bodies appear decomposed, Will is still very much alive in a cocoon-like structure with a long tendril going into his mouth, not unlike the proboscis used by the facehuggers in Alien to impregnate their hosts. We don’t dwell on this too much though, because Joyce and Sheriff Hopper find him right then and take him home. The next few panels before the end are of Will recovering in the hospital and it leads to my favorite part of the whole series: while talking to his mom and brother, we see from Will’s point of view and for a moment, he sees them and his surroundings as if they were in the Upsidedown, with the two of them appearing decomposed while still talking to him. Will convinces himself it’s just his imagination, but leads to the idea that he is still connected to the Upsidedown, which we see later in season 2.

All in all, it was good. The art was well drawn, and the covers of each issue evoke the style of horror and sci-fi movie posters from the 80’s like The Thing and Aliens. The Easter eggs I caught were nice also, such as Mike reading Stephen King’s The Dark Tower in a flashback to get ideas for future D&D campaigns, and a brief glimpse of the Mindflayer, who did not appear in season 1 but was the big bad of season 2. You won’t miss anything important if you skip out on this comic, they leave the worldbuilding to the show, but for fans like myself who can’t get enough of this story, it fills in some of the gaps and gives you more of Will so he feels like he was there the whole time. I’m looking forward to more side stories but really hope they also expand on the mythology. So until the release of Season 3, due July 4th, 2019, this has been John reminding you to Geek Out!

Overall rating of 7.5 out of 10.

Comic Cultre With Rafa: #003

The Standard Of True Heroism: Mirio Togata in My Hero Academia Vol. 17

By Rafael Encinas

Volume 17 of the wildly popular manga series, My Hero Academia, hit shelves this week, and there is something special to celebrate in this volume. The Raid on the Hassaikai Gang arc is one of mixed opinion, but fans can agree that it showcases some astounding moments.  Up until this point, we follow our heroes as they try to catch up with and detain the deadly Overhaul and his deadly gang of Yakuza called the Eight Precepts of Death, but we see the heroes get separated in the underground tunnels/labyrinth.

The plot up to this point is all about taking down Overhaul’s criminal organization, especially considering that they are producing bullets with the power to permanently erase quirks, this series’ version of superpowers. The key to this is in the special quirk residing in Eri, a little girl that Mirio and Midoriya failed to save earlier in the arc.

In this volume we finally witness one of the heroes catch up to Overhaul and his Yakuza minions, and that hero isn’t Deku, the main protagonist… it’s Mirio.

Outnumbered and less experienced, the deck is stacked against the pro hero in training. But Mirio does something wild in these chapters.

We expect Mirio to put up a good fight; after all, he’s been hyped up and we’ve seen him excel as a fighter in previous volumes. But he not only overcomes the odds and actually rescues the frightened Eri, he does it easily!

This is huge because, as already mentioned, Mirio is a hero in training. He is not a pro, yet. Overhaul is not a joke of a villain. He is a cruel, conniving, and powerful sociopath with the power to disassemble and reassemble anything he touches.

Mirio kicks his ass! He saves Eri and he does it in a way that feels powerful. We see this little girl who is used to pain and fear watch someone actually come to her rescue. Mirio actually exemplifies the very definition of being a hero.

And in this volume, we get so much more than a beautifully illustrated fight sequence. We get to see just what being a hero means to Mirio. This is a kid who worked tirelessly to turn a difficult quirk, permeation, into a Top Tier super power. His judgement, reflexes, and timing are all in tune, and we get to see him perform some of the coolest moves in the manga. And there is so much heart in these panels as we see Mirio fight so desperately for the little girl that is used to being used and abused.

Ultimately, he makes the ultimate sacrifice by taking a bullet for Eri, losing his powers in the process. But like a real hero, he continues fighting and protecting Eri for a full 3rd of the fight depowered. Mirio is no joke, and again, it is powerful to see someone give so much to save one individual. Mirio came up with his hero name, Lemillion, by vowing to save a million people. And in a poetic and poignant moment, he was able to save just one girl. And he does it without hesitation. This is the standard of a true hero!

And it has become the standard for this popular manga to wow audiences with interesting and unique powers, to astound us with epic fight sequences, and to motivate us with shonen style life lessons. If you don’t believe me, check out the phenomenal anime. It is worth your time. This is a special volume in an outstanding series. Let us all be like Lemillion. Let us all live up to that standard of true heroism.

Gaming With Jeremy: Apex Legends

A Review From Jeremy Miller

When it comes to video games, the big thing right now is “Battle Royales”. Whether you prefer to play solo or with a squad, there is no shortage of options. Fortnite and PUBG have been two of the most popular for well over a year, and the bigger developers have taken notice and even came out with their own versions of the popular genre. Respawn Entertainment, the creators of the Titanfall game franchise, have created a BR called ‘Apex Legends’. It feels as if all I have played in the last year are “Battle Royales”, so I was a little skeptical when I first played it, thinking that it would feel the same as the others with just with different cosmetics. Man was I wrong, and I’m glad I was.

‘Apex Legends’ is a class based shooter, meaning each character has abilities and specials that only they can use. For instance, Lifeline is a Combat Medic. She can deploy a healing drone and drop a care package for her team to get defensive and healing supplies. Bangalore is a combat specialist, or DPS, character. She can throw out smoke grenades and when her special is ready, can drop Rolling Thunder, an artillery strike. With each character having their own strengths and abilities, the game kinda forces players to play with a team first mentality, rather than running off on your own. And that alone separates ‘Apex Legends’ from the other BR games at the moment.

‘Apex Legends’ is a beautiful game. The graphics are amazing and if it weren’t for other players trying to shoot my head off, I’d probably have time to snap more screenshots. The only game mode is Trios, meaning that if you don’t have a friend or two in your party, the game will match you with randoms. The game will randomly select who picks their character first, then second and third. The other new thing that was added, is called a Jumpmaster, who is also selected at random. The Jumpmaster is the one who can select a spot and jump out of the flying vehicle to land at that position. The game does give the option for a player to break away from the group and go off on their own. Once your team has landed, the mission to survive begins. There is plenty of loot laying around for everyone to have 2 weapons of their choice with a couple of attachments. Which in turn makes it extremely interesting if there are other groups that landed with you.

Not only is Apex Legends a beautiful designed game with great mechanics, it’s also free on PC, XBox and PlayStation. I can’t wait to see what new characters Respawn has in store for us. I have yet been able to secure a victory, but that doesn’t matter. I like to play games because I have fun, especially if it’s with friends. But I would be lying if I told you I don’t have a competitive side. I will get that win one day. And I’ll brag about it to my cat.
Overall I would have to rate this game a solid 9/10.

Find Jeremy streaming here:
https://mixer.com/xPsykoSlimx